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Is Aquaman basically 'wet Thor'?

Writer: Naseem Randhawa



Thor and Aquaman, same same but different?

One of the founding members of Justice League, Aquaman, finally had his solo outing! What a movie it was, in having finally gotten the formula right for the DC Extended Universe - and somehow managed to make a character whose powers is to talk to fishes, actually really super cool!

However, we couldn't help but notice the many- intentional or not - similarities between Aquaman and the Marvel superhero, Thor.

But first, here is an abs-tastic photo of Aquaman and Thor to calm your nerves in case you are triggered:

The Aquaman character first made his debut via DC Comics' "More Fun Comics" #73 in November 1941, but it wasn't until the Silver Age of superhero revival of the '60s, was he made a founding member of the Justice League and got his turn as a more serious character worthy of his King of Atlantis title.

Thor first appeared in Marvel Comics' "Journey into Mystery" #83 in August 1962, however a different version of Thor had first appeared in "Venus" #12–13 (February–April 1951).


So, no matter which superhero came first, we don't think this should be a cause for war for both fans of both DC and Marvel, in fact, these amusing similarities should be cause for celebration, as it only means, that when done right, at the end of the day we get kickass superhero movies!

OK. You ready? Let's look at the similarities between Aquaman and Thor below: 

Both the heroes are royalty

via GIPHY

 The Aquaman and Thor movies are deeply rooted in mythology. While "Aquaman" is based on Ancient Greek, "Thor" is derived from Norse, so it's only fitting that both the superheroes are somewhat significant members of the historical myths, and what better way to do that than to make them standout as royalty?

via GIPHY

Aquaman aka. Arthur Curry is the rightful heir of the seven seas which would make him King of Atlantis. Thor, the Prince of Asgard and God of Thunder, is the rightful ruler of the kingdom taking over after the death of his father, King Odin.

From magical realms: Atlantis and Asgard

Atlantis

Aquaman is king of the underwater Kingdom of Atlantis that was first created by a humanoid extra-terrestrial race some 65 million years ago as a magical continent above land. The seven kingdoms only formed after the original Atlantis city sunk into the ocean and they are: Atlantis, Xebel, the Kingdom of the Trench, the Brine, the Kingdom of the Fishermen, the Kingdom of the Deserters, and a missing mysterious kingdom.


Asgard

Thor is from Asgard, a realm from Norse mythology which according to Asgardian legend says, "in the beginning there was nothing, but in time two worlds came into being on opposite sides of the void." There is a whole story on it that revolves around giants and cows (really) and the eventual birth of Asgardians as a race that's 'licked out of ice'. The Asgardian dimension has nine realms: Alfheim (home of the Light Elves), Asgard (home of the Asgardian race), Hel (realm of the dead ruled by Hela), Jotunheim (realm of Frost Giants), Midgard (Earth), Muspelheim (realm of Demons ruled by Surtur), Nidavellir (home of the Dwarves), Svartalfheim (realm of the Dark Elves), Vanaheim (home of the Asgardian sister race, Vanir).

The rainbow bridge portal

The bridge to Atlantis.

Of course, when one lives in magical lands, there needs to be a portal to lead to us non-magical folk, it just so happens that in both movies that said portal is a bridge. In "Aquaman", the rainbow bridge is an entry and exit point for Atlantis. It is believed that the bridge is controlled by a Maelstorm device created by the elders, which allows exploitation of space-time deviations.


Rainbow bridge protected by Heimdall.

In "Thor", the bridge that connects the worlds is known as Bifröst, and the rainbow bridge is guarded by Heimdall, as it is an important link between the Nine Realms and opening it all the time would destroy all realms. 

A$$hole brother

via GIPHY

 This one is pretty obvious. In "Aquaman", Arthur Curry's main enemy is his half-brother, Orm, who is of true Atlantean origin and they share the same mother. Being half-human and half-Atlantean himself, Arthur wants to stop Orm from bringing war upon humans.

via GIPHY

As seen in all-three "Thor" and the first and third "Avenger" movies, Thor's adopted brother Loki was at first Thor's biggest enemy, but their relationship slowly changed to being 'Frenemies' in the later Marvel movies 

Weapons that can be used only if you're worthy

via GIPHY

 At the behest of Mera, Arthur Curry is urged to find the Trident of King Atlan a.k.a. the Trident of Atlantis. It is a magical artifact forged with Poseidon steel that once belonged to Atlantis' first ruler, and can only be claimed by the rightful king that is worthy.

via GIPHY

The Mjölnir is Thor's weapon given to him by his father. Forged in the heart of a dying star, the mystical hammer grants the God of Thunder the power to fly, and summon lightning. Only those who are worthy are able to lift the hammer. Loki, Captain America, Iron Man and The Hulk have all failed, except for Vision. 

Behind every successful man is a woman (to put him in his place)

via GIPHY

 In order for Aquaman to truly learn of his origins and Atlantis, he is visited by Mera, the daughter of King Nereus of Xebel. With her knowledge of Atlantean history, she aids Arthur in his quest to find the Trident of Atlan.

via GIPHY

In the first two Thor movies, the God of Thunder learns how precious the human race is thanks to astrophysicist Dr. Jane Foster, played by Natalie Portman. Pretty much a fish out of water when he arrives to Earth, he has his Asgardian arrogance knocked out of him by Jane with a smack of humble pie.

The fiery monsters!

Karathen in "Aquaman".

What is a superhero movie without its colossal monsters? We have the Karathen in "Aquaman", who is the fearsome undersea guardian of the Trident of Atlan. Did you know the creature is voiced by Julie Andrews? Anyway, soon after Aquaman claims the trident, he mounts Karathen to face Orm and his army.


Surtur in "Thor: Ragnarok".

The monster in Thor is actually a fire demon and ruler of Muspelheim, Surtur. Despite initially defeating the monster that is supposed to start Ragnarok in the third "Thor" movie, Thor and Loki eventually resurrect it to destroy their evil sister Hela, and along with it Asgard.

Cinema Online, 21 December 2018


Related Movies:
Aquaman (13 Dec 2018)
Thor: Ragnarok (26 Oct 2017)
Thor: The Dark World (31 Oct 2013)
Thor (28 Apr 2011)
Avengers: Infinity War (25 Apr 2018)
Avengers: Endgame (24 Apr 2019)

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