Movie Details

GRAN TORINO

Korean War veteran Walt Kowalski becomes increasingly unhappy with the arrival of some Hmong people into his neighbourhood. When neighbour Tao was caught trying to steal Walt`s vintage 1972 Gran Torino, the boy is forced to work for Kowalski. Isolated from his own family members and having just lost his wife, Kowalski gradually becomes friendly with Tao and his family. Eventually he learns about Hmong culture even. Soon, Walt loses his racist side and becomes protective to Tao and his sister from gang harassment.

Language: English
Subtitle: NA
Classification: NC16
Release Date: 26 Mar 2009
Genre: Action / Drama
Running Time: 1 Hour 57 Minutes
Distributor: GOLDEN VILLAGE PICTURES
Cast: Clint Eastwood, Cory Hardrict, John Carroll Lynch, Geraldine Hughes
Director: Clint Eastwood
Format: NA

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Review
Writer: Ezekiel Lee Zhiang Yang

Writer Ratings:
Overall:
Cast:
Plot:
Effects: NA
Cinematography:

Watch this if you liked: "Million Dollar Baby", "Always Outnumbered", "Falling Down"

Romantic, out-of-time and very Eastwood, the 1972 Gran Torino Sport featured in this film seemed not to suffer any of the severe paint-peeling problems that models from that era were known to have, but Clint himself sure does.

"Gran Torino" just happens to be one of those films one desperately wants to be great - but in all honestly, just isn't.

Playing a very convincing Korean War vet of Polish descent named Walt Kowalski, Clint Eastwood is too comfortable as a grumbling old man who can't stand the immigrant Hmong community who populates his neighbourhood. All-American, beer guzzling good sense tells the embittered seventysomething that he knows more than anybody else, so he doesn't give a hoot about anyone's advice, especially the young preacher who tries to convert him after his wife's recent demise.

With strong themes of redundancy, racism and redemption, "Gran Torino" plots the character arc of a man who comes full circle when he ends up protecting the very people he hates (with his trusty shotgun, of course) while letting the titular vehicle represent the old time glory of things that are beautiful or classic but have to strive to remain relevant.

While the acting are all top notch, especially for relative unknowns, the movie is overlong and ends up meandering. Decidedly dogmatic (though noble), "Gran Torino" achieves just one moment of good reflection that elevates Eastwood's predictable rambling - that is the scene when he smashes his hands through the wood and glass cupboard doors. However, the lack of a suitable score and the easy climax let the film down and it just doesn't go down as a highly memorable piece of work.

The old man was truly great in his time. This movie is a testament to 'fading away' instead of the more cinematic 'burning out'. Well, this might very well be the last time Eastwood calls somebody a zipperhead, fish head or even Yum Yum in a movie, so we'll bear the mediocrity in honour of his legend.

Cinema Online, 02 March 2009
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Classification
Effective 15 July 2011
G - Suitable for all ages
PG - Suitable for all ages, but parents should provide guidance to their young
PG13 - Suitable for persons aged 13 and above, but parental guidance is advised for children below 13
NC16 - Suitable for persons aged 16 years and above
M18 - Suitable for persons aged 18 years and above
R21 - Restricted to persons aged 21 and above only
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