Movie Details

Being Flynn

Academy Award-nominated writer-director Paul Weitz ("About A Boy") turns his hand to this moving portrait of fathers and sons. Based on a true story, "Being Flynn" follows Nick Flynn (Paul Dano of "Little Miss Sunshine", "There Will Be Blood") who is shocked to have his eccentric and long-absent father, Jonathan (two-time Academy Award winner Robert De Niro) reach out to him unexpectedly. Still feeling the loss of his mother (played in flashbacks by four-time Academy Award nominee Julianne Moore) in the midst of starting a new relationship with Denise (JUNO`s Olivia Thirlby), the last person Nick wants to see is his father. But you cannot outrun fate and slowly Nick comes to realize he has been given the chance to make a real future not only for himself, but for his struggling father too.

Language: English
Subtitle: NA
Classification: M18
Release Date: 10 May 2012
Genre: Comedy / Drama
Running Time: 1 Hour 42 Minutes
Distributor: SHAW ORGANISATION
Cast: Robert De Niro, Paul Dano, Julianne Moore, Olivia Thirlby
Director: Paul Weitz
Format: NA

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Review
Writer: Lester Gan Wai Lun

Writer Ratings:
Overall:
Cast:
Plot:
Effects: NA
Cinematography:

Watch this if you liked: “Running With Scissors” & “Rocket Science”

"Being Flynn", directed by Paul Weitz, is an adaptation of Nick Flynn's "Another Bullshit Night in Suck City: A Memoir" with Robert De Niro and Paul Dano as the lead. A film filled with drug use, homelessness, and family conflicts. But as exciting and emotional as that sounds, its subtle approach has made it annoyingly bland.

Nick Flynn (Paul Dano) is a wannabe writer with major daddy issues who had just acquired a job at a homeless shelter. His father whom he has not seen in 18 years, Jonathan Flynn (Robert De Niro), is a self absorbed racist homophobe and works as taxi driver. Through a series of events, Jonathan manages to lose his driving license and is forced to leave his home which then brings him to the homeless shelter where Nick is working to create all sorts of trouble and dysfunctional family awkwardness.

While Robert De Niro's acting was top notch as usual, the character he played in this film is just like the friend that we all have who always brags at what they do, but has nothing to back themselves up with, and after a while this reviewer finds himself just tuning out to whatever he has to say. Paul Dano however has his ups and downs throughout his career; in here it was just mediocre as compared to his performances in "There Will Be Blood" or "Little Miss Sunshine", as he fails to register the right emotions his character is experiencing.

If the film was anything like the book, it must not have been a very good book or the adaptation has failed miserably. Enjoying the film is dependent on how well the audience is able to cope with the things that didn't work and be satisfied with the things that did.

Cinema Online, 30 April 2012
   
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Classification
Effective 15 July 2011
G - Suitable for all ages
PG - Suitable for all ages, but parents should provide guidance to their young
PG13 - Suitable for persons aged 13 and above, but parental guidance is advised for children below 13
NC16 - Suitable for persons aged 16 years and above
M18 - Suitable for persons aged 18 years and above
R21 - Restricted to persons aged 21 and above only
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